grafting conundrum - bud or saddle?

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hailtryfan
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2011 4:14 pm

grafting conundrum - bud or saddle?

Post by hailtryfan » Wed Oct 12, 2011 1:19 pm

Hello all,

Last year I bought several m26 and mm106 rootstocks with the plan of grafting them over and growing them on as espaliers and cordons in my allotment fruit garden. Disaster struck however when all my carefully sourced scion wood started growing in the fridge :-(

As a result I wasn't able to graft the scion wood, and while I intended instead to bud graft the rootstocks during the summer, I didn't get around to it.

Now my rootstocks have grown considerably and I'm worried that they will be too thick to graft scion wood onto near ground level. I could still bud graft in the summer but that will sacrifice another years growth.

Can anyone suggest the best way for me to proceed? Is there another graft I could use that is suitable for thinner scion wood with thicker rootstock?

Thanks

Mike

macmanmatty
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 2:59 pm

Re: grafting conundrum - bud or saddle?

Post by macmanmatty » Wed Oct 12, 2011 7:01 pm

I would use either the cleft or a the rind (bark) graft.

hailtryfan
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2011 4:14 pm

Re: grafting conundrum - bud or saddle?

Post by hailtryfan » Sun Oct 16, 2011 4:35 pm

Thanks for the suggestion. After a bit more research I've decided to take your advice and cleft graft them.

appledude
Posts: 429
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2008 12:24 pm

Re: grafting conundrum - bud or saddle?

Post by appledude » Wed Dec 21, 2011 7:11 pm

hailtryfan wrote: Now my rootstocks have grown considerably and I'm worried that they will be too thick to graft scion wood onto near ground level. I could still bud graft in the summer but that will sacrifice another years growth
Hi Mike, you havent lost anything! Nothing is too thick to graft!

You can still whip and tongue graft those stocks, even if they are a little large when you get to them. As long as they have their roots in ground or dirt, you are miles ahead. Just make the wound on the stock exactly to fit the wound of your scion, match the two up and bind well. Check for any air gaps that could dry the union out and use kids modeling clay to seal up holes. Paint some glue over the clay when you are all finished to hold it all in place. Paint glue over your scion as well, the whole thing. Keeps it from drying out, more ensuring your success.

Good luck!

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