Cultivar versus Trademark names?

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otma1918
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Cultivar versus Trademark names?

Post by otma1918 » Fri Aug 17, 2012 7:32 pm

I keep a list of apples that I have tried, but regarding the name/variety, I usually can only go by whatever the apples are labeled at the store/on the sticker. Therefore, I have something of a problem when there are several different names that one kind of apple may have. A good example would be a Pink Lady apple; I've also come across it as a Cripps Pink. Pink Lady is just the trade name that a Cripps Pink is sold under. So, unknowingly I record two different apples when in fact they're the same thing.

Can anyone help me out with these others to let me know if they're the same or different apples/cultivars? If possible, identifying the trade name would laos help a lot!

Pinova- Pinata- Sonata- Corail ?

HoneyCrisp- HoneyCrunch?

Sundowner- Cripps Red?

Pacific Rose- Southern Rose- NZ Rose- Scirose/Sciros?

Tentation- Delblush?

NZ Queen- Pacific Queen?

SweeTango- Minneiska?

New Zealand or NZ Beauty- Pacific Beauty?

And of course, if anyone has ever heard of or seen a variety called Embergo, I'd love to know more about it!

Thanks!

OrangePippin-Richard
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Re: Cultivar versus Trademark names?

Post by OrangePippin-Richard » Thu Aug 23, 2012 1:08 am

Pink Lady is Cripps Pink ... but it can be sold under both names. I believe that to be sold as Pink Lady the fruit has to meet specific color standards, with the less-colored fruits being sold as Cripps Pink.

Sundowner = Cripps Red.

Jazz = Scifresh.

Tentation = Delblush (I think we have this duplicated on the OP database, most varieties originating from the French Delbard nursery are prefixed with "Del").

Honeycrisp / Honeycrunch ... I've never been sure about this one, but I think they are the same thing.

Pinova = Pinata ... but I am not sure which is the trademark and which is the cultivar name.

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PA_Docent
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Re: Cultivar versus Trademark names?

Post by PA_Docent » Tue Sep 04, 2012 2:18 am

SweeTango is the trademark name of the apple that grows on the Minneiska apple tree (really a Minneiska apple).

Pacific Rose is the trademarked name of the apple. NZ Rose or just "Rose" are recent names for the same apple. The name of the Scirose apple is the title of the United States Patent PP07814 (check Google Patents).

Tentation is the trademarked name for the Delblush apple tree (check Wikipedia).

Hope this helps.
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otma1918
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Re: Cultivar versus Trademark names?

Post by otma1918 » Tue Sep 04, 2012 10:52 am

PA_Docent wrote:Pacific Rose is the trademarked name of the apple. NZ Rose or just "Rose" are recent names for the same apple. The name of the Scirose apple is the title of the United States Patent PP07814 (check Google Patents).
So, if I follow you, then when I've found an apple with a sticker that says Sciros or NZ Rose, they're the same apple as one that has a sticker with the name Pacific Rose, right? You lost me a little with the name being the title of the patent, b/c when I checked the patent title is "Patent PP07814 - Apple tree named `Sciros`"- I take that to mean the tree is named Sciros but not necessarily the apple (as in SweeTango's or Tentation's case).

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PA_Docent
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Re: Cultivar versus Trademark names?

Post by PA_Docent » Wed Sep 05, 2012 2:09 am

When a new variety of any plant is produced, the person who worked on developing that variety can obtain a patent (good for 10 years) or a trademark (indefinite in human terms) to protect their product for a length of time. That means if you purchase a patented or trademarked apple tree/fruit, the consumer is paying extra for that privilege. A trademarked name is usually a marketing ploy for a product; catchy word or phrase. That is why you find the "scientific" name and the trademarked name. Patents normally use the Latin or scientific name, for example, Euphorbia milli is the Latin/scientific name for a succulent but most people have not heard of the plant by that name. The trademarked name is the "Crown of Thorns" plant. Hope this explanation helps.
Calville Blc,Hewes,Nehou,Fearns P,Siberian,Cox OP,Spitz,Ananas Reinette,BdB,Kingston Blk,Tremlett's,Muscat de Bernay,Ashmead's,Rambo,Stayman,Macoun,Jefferis,Winesap,Red Berlepsch

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